A Glance at College Attainment in NYC

I’m taking a couple days off from work this week. Unfortunately, it’s raining, so I’m inside playing around with some county-level education data in R, and I thought I’d throw up a quick blog post. The data set, which goes back to the 1970s, comes courtesy of the USDA and can be found here.

A quirk of New York City is that each of the five boroughs is also its own county. I took the opportunity to make some graphs illustrating how educational attainment has changed in the city and its boroughs over the past 50 years. There are a few interesting insights to be had here:

New York City’s college attainment rate closely mimics the country’s. Since 1970, the percentage of residents over the age of 25 in both groups who have attended at least some college has risen from just over 20% to just under 60%.

US NYC

But between the boroughs, there’s quite a bit of diversity. Manhattan is the only borough to have ever had a higher than city-average rate of college attainment. What’s more, the gap between the Manhattan and the New York City average has only grown over time. That said, because it started out with a higher rate of college-educated residents, Manhattan has experienced the lowest rate of growth in this area. Here’s each borough compared with the city’s average over the last 50 years:

Boroughs Some College

Perhaps unsurprisingly, given its reputation as a hotbed of gentrification, Brooklyn leads the way in terms of educational growth among its residents. In 1970, Brooklyn and the Bronx had similar rates of residents with at least some college (12 and 13 percent, respectively), compared with a US average of 21.3%. By 2016, however, the gap between the former had widened to 10.5%. Brooklyn has surpassed Queens and is closing in on the NYC average.

A more detailed look at the change in educational attainment in Brooklyn, which now has slightly more residents with than without some college experience:

Rise of Educated Brooklyn

 

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